Formatted question description: https://leetcode.ca/all/751.html

751. IP to CIDR

Level

Easy

Description

Given a start IP address ip and a number of ips we need to cover n, return a representation of the range as a list (of smallest possible length) of CIDR blocks.

A CIDR block is a string consisting of an IP, followed by a slash, and then the prefix length. For example: “123.45.67.89/20”. That prefix length “20” represents the number of common prefix bits in the specified range.

Example 1:

Input: ip = "255.0.0.7", n = 10
Output: ["255.0.0.7/32","255.0.0.8/29","255.0.0.16/32"]
Explanation:
The initial ip address, when converted to binary, looks like this (spaces added for clarity): 255.0.0.7 -> 11111111 00000000 00000000 00000111
The address "255.0.0.7/32" specifies all addresses with a common prefix of 32 bits to the given address, ie. just this one address.

The address "255.0.0.8/29" specifies all addresses with a common prefix of 29 bits to the given address:
255.0.0.8 -> 11111111 00000000 00000000 00001000
Addresses with common prefix of 29 bits are:
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001000
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001001
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001010
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001011
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001100
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001101
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001110
11111111 00000000 00000000 00001111

The address "255.0.0.16/32" specifies all addresses with a common prefix of 32 bits to the given address,
ie. just 11111111 00000000 00000000 00010000.

In total, the answer specifies the range of 10 ips starting with the address 255.0.0.7.

There were other representations, such as:
["255.0.0.7/32","255.0.0.8/30", "255.0.0.12/30", "255.0.0.16/32"],
but our answer was the shortest possible.

Also note that a representation beginning with say, "255.0.0.7/30" would be incorrect, because it includes addresses like 255.0.0.4 = 11111111 00000000 00000000 00000100 that are outside the specified range.

Note:

  1. ip will be a valid IPv4 address.
  2. Every implied address ip + x (for x < n) will be a valid IPv4 address.
  3. n will be an integer in the range [1, 1000].

Solution

First convert the given ip to a number of long type. Then obtain the long number of the end ip.

Starting from the number of the given ip, obtain the lowest bit that is one in the number, which can be obtained by Long.lowestOneBit(num) where num is a number of long type. If the lowest bit that is one covers the numbers that exceed the end ip, then go to the lower bit until the bit doesn’t cover the numbers that exceed the end ip. Calculate the number of ips that can be covered, which is k, generate the CIDR block and add it to the result list, and move to the k-th next ip. Repeat the process until all the n ips are covered.

Companies:
Facebook, Amazon, Google

Related Topics:
Hash Table, String, Sliding Window

Similar Questions:

Java

class Solution {
    public List<String> ipToCIDR(String ip, int n) {
        long ipStart = ipToLong(ip);
        long ipEnd = ipStart + n;
        List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
        long ipCur = ipStart;
        while (ipCur < ipEnd) {
            long lowestBit = Long.lowestOneBit(ipCur);
            while (ipCur + lowestBit > ipEnd)
                lowestBit /= 2;
            int bitNum = (int) (Math.log(lowestBit) / Math.log(2));
            String block = longToIP(ipCur) + "/" + (32 - bitNum);
            list.add(block);
            ipCur += lowestBit;
        }
        return list;
    }

    public long ipToLong(String ip) {
        String[] array = ip.split("\\.");
        long ipLong = 0;
        int length = array.length;
        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
            ipLong <<= 8;
            ipLong += Long.parseLong(array[i]);
        }
        return ipLong;
    }

    public String longToIP(long num) {
        int[] array = new int[4];
        for (int i = 3; i >= 0; i--) {
            int remainder = (int) (num % 256);
            array[i] = remainder;
            num /= 256;
        }
        StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
        for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
            if (i > 0)
                sb.append('.');
            sb.append(array[i]);
        }
        return sb.toString();
    }
}

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